Practicing the Art of Shameless Self-Promotion

I may have mentioned before that I’m a writer. And like any good writer, I occasionally have to fall victim to shameless self-promotion. I may have also mentioned that anxiety is a problem for me, so self-promotion isn’t a thing that comes easily to me. However! Nothing is easier to share than good news, and today brought a little of that with it. (Despite my inability to find that one red sweater this morning or my favorite fluffy winter socks, leaving for work when I should have been arriving at work, or having to wait in the freezing wind for a train to pass before I could cross the road to my car after work.)

I am a travel writer. (Slash editor.) It’s certainly an interesting job, though I can guess your first question and the answer is no, I don’t get to travel a lot. But that’s okay, too; having to write on topics like the coolest speakeasies in the country or some new cultural center without actually visiting these places does help flex my research and creative muscles.

Sometimes it’s frustrating, like any job. But sometimes, when I come in to work and see that the top two stories on our homepage have my byline on them, it’s worth it.

The Midnight Carnival: One Night Only

I got published last year!

Additionally, last October I had the interesting experience of being published in an anthology, a collaborative work among eight people spread across the U.S. The collection of shorts features two collabs featuring me and one solo work, all original for the project. It’s called The Midnight Carnival, and I really hope you’ll check it out. I’m pretty proud of it, and I let all the fame go to my head and now frequently compare myself to Suzanne Collins and Percival Everett.

Ok, that last part was a joke and no, it wasn’t very funny, but hey. People gotta have dreams.

The Style Sheet That Influenced Hemingway

I’ll be the first to admit that Hemingway isn’t among my favorite writers. But that doesn’t mean I can’t acknowledge him as a powerhouse writer, and it doesn’t stop me from wondering what helped him develop his iconic style. So when I see a title like this, I sit up and take note. It’s definitely worth a look, and there are some excellent points I can learn a lot from. (Even if Old Man and the Sea never finds a home on my bookshelf.)

101 Books

This is a copy of the style sheet Ernest Hemingway used while working at The Kansas City Star early in his career as a writer.

It’s a little difficult to read. But if you can read it, there’s still a lot of good, relevant advice in there–especially considering he used it in 1917.

Hemingway said he was heavily influenced by this style sheet throughout his career.

Take a look at the PDF.

Notice the first few sentences in the top left of the page: “Use short sentences. Use short first paragraphs. Use vigorous English.”

Yeah, that’s definitely Hemingway.

Some other excerpts:

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